November Reading List

November is a cozy month. It includes the end of daylight saving with darker evenings and earlier bedtimes; Thanksgiving celebrations with travel, family, and friends; and the preparations for the coming winter months with leaf raking and acorn burying. WAIT. Was that a snowflake? No, no. No yet mother nature. Not yet.

To me November means longer evenings indoors with cozy blankets and pillows and time to read. The following are five books that are on my reading list.


 Eating Animals (C&A November Book Club) Jonathan Safran Foer

Eating Animals (C&A November Book Club) Jonathan Safran Foer

Kacey selected this one as the November book club pick. It caught her eye because she’s been interested lately on reading about health and the overall topic of exploring our food system. Foer’s other books are also excellent. In fact Extremely Loud and Incredibly Close is one of my (Katie’s) favorite books. Below is the description of Eating Animals.


Eating Animals

Bestselling author Jonathan Safran Foer spent much of his life oscillating between enthusiastic carnivore and occasional vegetarian. For years he was content to live with uncertainty about his own dietary choices-but once he started a family, the moral dimensions of food became increasingly important.

Faced with the prospect of being unable to explain why we eat some animals and not others, Foer set out to explore the origins of many eating traditions and the fictions involved with creating them. Traveling to the darkest corners of our dining habits, Foer raises the unspoken question behind every fish we eat, every chicken we fry, and every burger we grill.

 Nomad Land (NONFICTION) Jessica Bruder

Nomad Land (NONFICTION) Jessica Bruder

Nomadland

Frankly, this next topic isn’t something I have thought about. Ever. So while I was pursuing lists and lists of books, this one caught my eye. I’m a big fan of non-fiction books because of the learning that innately comes with them. Here’s the description:


From the beet fields of North Dakota to the National Forest campgrounds of California to Amazon's CamperForce program in Texas, employers have discovered a new, low-cost labor pool, made up largely of transient older Americans. Finding that Social Security comes up short, often underwater on mortgages, these invisible casualties of the Great Recession have taken to the road to form a growing community of nomads: migrant laborers who call themselves "workampers."

  Five-Carat Soul (SHORT STORIES, FICTION) James McBride

Five-Carat Soul (SHORT STORIES, FICTION) James McBride

Five-Carat Soul

Short story collections are compelling, thought-provoking, and offer a “flight” of the author’s writing for you to enjoy. I’m intrigued by the variety of stories covered in FIVE-CARAT SOUL. Read more below.


The stories in Five-Carat Soul—none of them ever published before—spring from the place where identity, humanity, and history converge. An antiques dealer discovers that a legendary toy commissioned by Civil War General Robert E. Lee now sits in the home of a black minister in Queens. Five strangers find themselves thrown together and face unexpected judgment. An American president draws inspiration from a conversation he overhears in a stable. And members of The Five-Carat Soul Bottom Bone Band recount stories from their own messy and hilarious lives. 

  The Song Machine: Inside the Hit Factory (NONFICTION) John Seabrook

The Song Machine: Inside the Hit Factory (NONFICTION) John Seabrook

The Song Machine

Why do some songs become so popular everyone and their grandma know about it? Sometimes I hear a song and think yuck, nope. And then by the 3rd time I hear it I’m calling my friends, “HEY HAVE YOU HEARD THIS? DON’T YOU LOVE IT I LOVE IT.” Why does that happen? Turns out there’s a lot of research, song crafting, and a delicate process that goes into creating those catchy hits. Check it out below.


Over the last two decades a new type of hit song has emerged, one that is almost inescapably catchy. Pop songs have always had a "hook," but today's songs bristle with them: a hook every seven seconds is the rule. Painstakingly crafted to tweak the brain's delight in melody, rhythm, and repetition, these songs are highly processed products. Like snack-food engineers, modern songwriters have discovered the musical "bliss point." And just like junk food, the bliss point leaves you wanting more.



  One More Thing: Stories and Other Stories (ESSAYS) BJ Novak

One More Thing: Stories and Other Stories (ESSAYS) BJ Novak

One More Thing

Hi. I’m Katie. I have seen The Office 48 million times and I’ll watch it 89 million more times. BJ Novak aka Ryan aka Ry Guy was a writer for The Office. Honestly, this book falls under the why not? category. Funny and quirky? Sign me up.

Description below.


B.J. Novak's One More Thing: Stories and Other Stories is an endlessly entertaining, surprisingly sensitive, and startlingly original debut that signals the arrival of a brilliant new voice in American fiction.

A boy wins a $100,000 prize in a box of Frosted Flakes—only to discover that claiming the winnings might unravel his family. A woman sets out to seduce motivational speaker Tony Robbins—turning for help to the famed motivator himself. A new arrival in Heaven, overwhelmed with options, procrastinates over a long-ago promise to visit his grandmother. We meet Sophia, the first artificially intelligent being capable of love, who falls for a man who might not be ready for it himself; a vengeance-minded hare, obsessed with scoring a rematch against the tortoise who ruined his life; and post-college friends who try to figure out how to host an intervention in the era of Facebook.  Along the way, we learn why wearing a red T-shirt every day is the key to finding love, how February got its name, and why the stock market is sometimes just . . . down.


Well here we are. Short and sweet for those long nights. All these books are ready to join you and keep you company. Let them, won’t you?

Katie Terhune